Oncology News Round-Up: CNS Tumors in Children Not Linked to Maternal Contraception

Each week on DocWire News, editors bring you the latest in oncology news and cancer research. In case you missed it, here are this week’s top headlines:

Keep reading for the breakdown on these top stories.

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Maternal Hormonal Contraception, CNS Tumors Not Linked in Children

Maternal hormonal contraception use is not associated with central nervous system (CNS) tumors among children, according to a Danish study published in JAMA.

The researchers analyzed data from 1,185,063 children born in Denmark between 1996 and 2014. Overall, 725 children were diagnosed with a CNS tumor after 15,335,990 person-years of follow-up. The mean age at diagnosis was 7 years, and 47.2% of tumors were in female patients. Compared with mothers with no use of hormonal contraceptives, there were no significant associations seen for recent or previous use of oral combined, nonoral combined, oral progestin-only, or nonoral products.

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Maternal Hormonal Contraception, CNS Tumors Not Linked in Children

Major Financial Hardship Prevalent in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

More than 70% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have major financial hardship at one year, despite being insured, according to a study published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center examined 380 patients (78% White, 98% insured, 57% with annual income ≤$50,000) within 120 days of mCRC diagnosis. The cumulative Major financial hardship was defined as one or more of increased debt, new loans from family and/or friends, selling or refinancing a home, or ≥20 percent decline in income. Quarterly questionnaires were completed for 12 months. At one year, 71.3% of participants reported major financial hardship, with no significant associations observed for age, race, marital status, or income (split at $50,000 per year). Greater financial hardship was seen in patients with income <$100,000 and total assets <$100,000. There was an association between major financial hardship at three months and reduced social functioning and quality of life at six months.

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Major Financial Hardship Prevalent in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Cancer Patients with Breakthrough COVID-19 Remain at Risk for Severe Outcomes

Patients with cancer who develop breakthrough infection following COVID-19 vaccination remain at risk for severe outcomes, according to a study published online in the Annals of Oncology.

Researchers from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute examined patients with cancer who developed symptomatic COVID-19 following vaccination and compared outcomes to those of contemporary unvaccinated patients. Data were included for 1,787 patients with cancer and COVID-19: 1,656 were unvaccinated, 77 were partially vaccinated, and 54 were fully vaccinated.

Patients with cancer and breakthrough COVID-19 cases considerable comorbidities. There was no statistically significant difference in 30-day mortality observed between fully vaccinated patients versus the unvaccinated cohort. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in intensive care unit/mechanical ventilation or hospitalization rates between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients. Among vaccinated patients with cancer who developed symptomatic COVID-19, patients harboring hematologic malignancies were overrepresented.

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Cancer Patients With Breakthrough COVID-19 Remain at Risk for Severe Outcomes

Many Believe Dietary Supplements Cut Risk for Cancer Recurrence

Nineteen percent of adults living with and beyond cancer believe that dietary supplements (DSs) are important for reducing cancer recurrence risk, according to a study published in Cancer.

A total of 1,049 participants completed a mailed survey and telephone or online 24-hour dietary recalls, which included supplement use. Nineteen percent believed that DSs were important for reducing cancer recurrence risk, and 40% reported using DSs. There was a positive association for DS use with being female, meeting five-a-day fruit and vegetable recommendations, and believing that DSs were important for reducing the risk for cancer recurrence. There was a negative association seen for DS use with having obesity. Fish oils were the most commonly taken DSs overall. The most common DS taken by individuals with breast cancer was calcium with or without vitamin D.

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Many Believe Dietary Supplements Cut Risk for Cancer Recurrence

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