HemOnc Roundup: ‘Going Flat’ After Mastectomy, COVID-19 and Multiple Myeloma, and more

Most Women Are Satisfied ‘Going Flat’ After Mastectomy, But Surgeons May Not Be Supportive of Decision

More women are opting to “go flat” after mastectomy—that is, opt not to undergo breast reconstruction surgery—according to a survey. However, not all women feel supported by their surgeon in this decision. To examine more closely how women feel about going flat, 931 women filled out an online survey pertaining to their satisfaction with mastectomy outcome and surgeon support for the patient experience.

Most Women Are Satisfied ‘Going Flat’ After Mastectomy, But Surgeons May Not Be Supportive of Decision

Higher Rates of COVID-19 Mortality for Patients with Multiple Myeloma

According to new data published in Blood, patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who are hospitalized for COVID-19 infection face higher mortality compared with patients without MM, with age, disease status, and renal involvement serving as predictors of worse outcomes. Immunosuppression often presents alongside MM, and infections are a common cause of morbidity and death in this patient population. Due to this, it is important to understand the relationship between MM and COVID-19-related outcomes, especially regarding susceptibility and the effect of therapy on infection.

Higher Rates of COVID-19 Mortality for Patients with Multiple Myeloma

Researchers Assess Strategies to Implement Exercise Intervention in Childhood Cancer Survivors

A study examined patterns and desires regarding exercise among childhood cancer survivors in order to glean a better understanding of how to implement an exercise intervention in this population. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle that includes physical activity may be more difficult for cancer survivors than the general population, the study authors explained, due to lingering treatment side effects, fatigue, and reduced muscle strength, not to mention emotional challenges. For childhood cancer survivors, this may be complicated further by “[a] lack of resources, negative thoughts and feelings toward a healthy lifestyle, and negative environmental and social influences.”

Researchers Assess Strategies to Implement Exercise Intervention in Childhood Cancer Survivors

Mothers/Fathers are Financially Impacted Differently By Having a Child Diagnosed with Cancer

Both mothers and fathers of children diagnosed with cancer are affected financially, but in different ways, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cancer. Previous research has shown that when a child falls ill with cancer, the parents are affected financially as well as psychologically. The available literature shows that mothers are more affected than fathers.

Mothers/Fathers are Financially Impacted Differently By Having a Child Diagnosed with Cancer