Hem/Onc Roundup: Prostate Cancer, Metastatic Breast Cancer, and more

Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer Treatment Resistance

A mutation in tumor suppressor gene RB1 is a strong driver of treatment resistance and predicts prognosis in patients with prostate cancer. Researchers found that cells with a RB1 deletion were also missing SUCLA2, a neighboring gene. Upon further analysis, they discovered that the frequency of SUCLA2 loss significantly aligned with RB1 loss at every disease stage, meaning that SUCLA2 deletion may be an identifier of patients who require advanced therapy.

Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer Treatment Resistance

Young Survivors of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Face High Risk of Future Health Complications

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients who were treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) face a high risk of developing long-term health complications later in life. Researchers found that 10 years after AML diagnosis, some patients developed an endocrine disease, a cardiovascular disease, or a respiratory disease. AYA survivors who underwent bone marrow transplant were at least twice as likely to later experience severe health complications.

Young Survivors of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Face High Risk of Future Health Complications

A Nurse Shares Her Journey with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Nurses are often thought of as the people who help patients get better when they’re sick; they are less often thought of as the ones who become sick. However, there are, of course, times when the nurse must become the patient. In a recent article, published in Annals of Family Medicine, one nurse shared her experience with being diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer.

A Nurse Shares Her Journey with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Early and Repeated Exposure to Diagnostic Imaging Increases Testicular Cancer Risk

A new study suggests that early and repeated exposure to diagnostic imaging, such as X-rays and computerized tomography (CT) scans, is linked to increased risk for testicular germ cell cancer. After adjusting for known testicular cancer risks, such as family history, race, and other factors, the investigators found a 59% increased risk increased risk of TGCT among participants who reported at least three exposures to X-ray and CT below the waist when compared to men with no such exposure.

Early and Repeated Exposure to Diagnostic Imaging Increases Testicular Cancer Risk