Black Men Require Better Mental Health Resources

Multilevel strategies are needed to address community mental health disparities among young Black men, according to a study published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Black men “are at increased risk for trauma exposure yet have a lower likelihood of receiving mental health care compared to other young adults,” the researchers wrote.

This particular study was a secondary data analysis conducted from a larger mixed-methods study that took places over 2 phases. Phase 1 comprised 55 Black men between the ages of 18 and 30 years old who had experienced 1 or more lifetime traumatic events. The researchers noted that, relevant for the present study, participants completed focus groups that elicited community needs and recommended strategies for promoting community mental health.

According to the results, focus group participants recommended the formation of intervention strategies from individual/interpersonal levels (such as educational resources and fostering social support) to organizational and community approaches (such as resource fairs and tools for schools, churches, and broader community settings) and policy changes (such as increased funding to improve access).

“Qualitative findings have potential to provide the foundation for culturally relevant interventions to improve access to mental health care and engagement in services,” the researchers concluded. They added that “it is imperative that researchers partner with communities to address these disparities.”