Heterogeneity in CV Mortality Seen in Asian American Subgroups

Among Asian American subgroups, there is heterogeneity in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality, according to a study published online May 10 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Nilay S. Shah, M.D., M.P.H., from the Stanford University School of Medicine in California, and colleagues examined cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease mortality trends in Asian American subgroups from 2003 to 2017. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were calculated by sex and subgroups including 618,004 non-Hispanic Asian American, 30,267,178 non-Hispanic White, and 2,292,257 Hispanic deaths from all causes.

The researchers found that in all subgroups of Asian American women and in non-Hispanic White and Hispanic women and in Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, and Korean men and non-Hispanic White and Hispanic men, the ASMRs from ischemic heart disease decreased significantly, while in Asian Indian and Vietnamese men, it remained stagnant. In 2017, the highest ASMRs from ischemic heart disease among Asian American decedents were in Asian Indian women and men (77 and 133 per 100,000, respectively). In Chinese, Korean, and non-Hispanic White women and Chinese and Vietnamese men, the ASMRs for heart failure remained stagnant. In Filipino, Asian Indian, and Japanese men and women, non-Hispanic White women, and Chinese and Vietnamese men, heart failure ASMRs increased significantly, with the highest ASMRs in 2017 seen for Asian Indian women and men (14 and 15 per 100,000, respectively). Decreases were seen in cerebrovascular ASMRs in Chinese, Filipino, and Japanese women and men between 2003 and 2017; in Asian Indian, Korean, and Vietnamese women and men, ASMRs remained stagnant.

“These heterogeneous trends emphasize the importance of tailoring clinical and public health cardiovascular disease prevention and management strategies to individual Asian American populations,” the authors write.

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