Alcohol consumption and risk of heart failure: Meta-analysis of 13 prospective studies

Publication date: August 2018
Source:Clinical Nutrition, Volume 37, Issue 4
Author(s): Susanna C. Larsson, Alice Wallin, Alicja Wolk
Background & aimsControversy exists on the association between alcohol consumption and risk of heart failure (HF). We carried out a meta-analysis to summarize available prospective data on alcohol consumption and HF.MethodsWe searched PubMed for relevant studies published until January 1, 2017. Relative risk (RR) estimates from individual studies were pooled in a random-effects meta-analysis.ResultsA total of 13 prospective studies, with 13,738 HF cases and 355,804 participants, were included in the meta-analysis. Light alcohol drinking (0.1–7 drinks/week) was inversely associated with risk of HF (RR, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.81–0.90). There was no statistically significant association between moderate (7.1–14 drinks/week), high (14.1–28 drinks/week), or heavy (>28 drinks/week) alcohol consumption and HF risk. Former drinking was associated with an increased risk of HF compared with never or occasional drinking (RR, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.11–1.33).ConclusionsThis meta-analysis found that light alcohol drinking was associated with a lower risk of HF. Former drinking was associated with a higher risk of HF.