Survey Finds Sigmoidoscopy Screening Reduces Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Men, But Not Women

A study published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that one-time sigmoidoscopy screening reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality in men, but this was not the case for women.

This randomized, controlled trial used data from the National Registry to identify 98,678 women and men aged 50 to 64 years in Oslo and Telemark County, Norway, who were eligible for sigmoidoscopy screening between 1999 and 2001: 20,552 were screened and 78,126 were not (control group).

The absolute risks for CRC in women were 1.86% in the screening group and 2.05% in the control group, for a risk difference of −0.19 percentage point (95% CI −0.49-0.11; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.92; 95% CI 0.79-1.07). For men, the absolute risks for CRC were 1.72% and 2.50%, respectively, for a risk difference of −0.78 percentage point (95% CI −1.08 to −0.48; HR=0.66; 95% CI 0.57-0.78; P=0.004).

The absolute risks of death from CRC in women were 0.60% in the screening group and 0.59% in the control group, for a risk difference of 0.01 percentage points (95% CI −0.16-0.18; HR=1.01; 95% CI 0.77-1.33]), while the risks of death for men were 0.49% and 0.81%, respectively, for a risk difference of −0.33 percentage points (95 % CI −0.49 to −0.16; HR=0.63; 95% CI 0.47-0.83; P=0.014).

Source: Annals of Internal Medicine