Oncology News Roundup: Hereditary CRC Risk, Fatigue in Childhood Cancer, and More

Each week on DocWire News, editors bring you the latest hematology and oncology news and research. In case you missed it, here are this week’s top headlines.

The highlights:

Keep reading for the breakdown on these top stories!

Impact of Sleep Disorders and Fatigue in Children with Cancer

A study of children with cancer identified an association between physical activity, fatigue, and sleep and quality of life (QOL), particularly distress. In addition, children on active treatment have a higher frequency of distress compared to those in survivorship.

The authors wrote, “Interventions to increase QOL should target children who are younger, male, and have higher levels of fatigue and sleep disturbance. Diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbance should be considered as part of routine activities.”

Impact of Sleep Disorders and Fatigue in Children with Cancer

A Number of Men May Stop Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

Although the use of active surveillance (AS) for low-risk prostate cancer significantly increased over time, there was a relatively high rate of discontinuation during a recent five-year period. In an assessment of men on AS, 51% discontinued AS after a median of 48 months.

“These results may help guide policy making, developing quality indicators, and developing targeted continued education for physicians and patients embarking on AS to establish realistic expectations,” the authors write.

A Number of Men May Stop Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

Study Highlights the Hereditary Risk of Colon Cancer

A recent study shows that having second- or third-degree relatives with colorectal cancer (CRC) augments the risk of developing the disease. First-degree relatives of someone diagnosed with early-onset CRC are six times more likely to be diagnosed with CRC before age 50, while second-degree relatives are three times likelier and third-degree relatives 1.56 times likelier.

“Our study provides new insight into the magnitude of risk for more distant relatives of colorectal cancer cases, and in particular, for relatives of cases who were diagnosed before age 50,” says first author Heather Ochs-Balcom, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health in UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions. “This work is important given the rising rates of early-onset colorectal cancer.”

Study Highlights the Hereditary Risk of Colon Cancer

Exercise Habit Prior to Breast Cancer Chemo May Aid Cognition

Doing more physical activity before and during chemotherapy is associated with better cognition over time among patients with breast cancer. Patients with higher physical activity prior to chemotherapy had higher cognitive scores over time compared to patients who did not. In addition, adherence to physical activity guidelines throughout chemotherapy was associated with better self-reported cognition.

“These findings contribute to the growing body of evidence highlighting the importance of promoting physical activity as early as possible across the continuum of cancer care,” said co-author Elizabeth A. Salerno, PhD, MPH, from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Exercise Habit Prior to Breast Cancer Chemo May Aid Cognition

Want to See More Oncology News?

Be sure to keep up with the latest oncology news and research here on DocWire, updated daily!

Hematology & Oncology