Ambient Air Exposures to Arsenic and Cadmium May Impact Prostate Cancer Survival

A study assessed whether higher ambient air concentrations of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are associated with lower overall and PC-specific survival among prostate cancer (PC) cases. The study was published in the journal Cancer.

Researchers analyzed incident PC cases of 78,914 patients, aged 40 years or older, with a clinical diagnosis and nonmetastatic disease from the 2004 to 2014 Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic information were extracted from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. They extracted the 3- and 5-year average and cumulative air concentrations of As and Cd from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxics Release Inventory database. Overall, the study analyzed 78,914 PC cases.

The results showed that increasing 3- and 5-year average and cumulative air concentrations of As and Cd were appreciably linked with lower overall and PC-specific survival among cases, even after adjusting for confounders, the total population, and after stratifying by geographical region.

The researchers concluded that the data suggest “that increasing ambient air exposures to As and Cd may play a role in overall and PC-specific mortality risk among PC cases. Exposures to As and Cd are modifiable and may provide insight into potential strategies to improve PC health outcomes.”