Rheum Round-up: Arthritis Treatments and COVID-19 Risk, High Anxiety in Rheumatic Patients, and more

Which Arthritis Treatments Increase The Risk for COVID-19?

Arthritis medications have been a hot topic during the COVID-19 pandemic, largely because they have been used in multiple trials as a possible treatment for the virus. However, patients with arthritis—as well as those with other autoimmune diseases—have also been a population of concern among providers because their disease may put them at an increased risk for the virus. Another topic that’s currently being explored is whether certain medications affect the risk for COVID-19. According to one study, glucocorticoids may increase the risk for COVID-19 infection, while targeted-synthetic/biological disease-modifying drugs may reduce the risk.

Which Arthritis Treatments Increase The Risk for COVID-19?

High Anxiety And Self-Isolation Caused By COVID-19 Pandemic in Patients With Inflammatory Rheumatic Disease

Concerns about mental health among the general population have been high, as people are isolated from others and possibly unable to receive the care or medications they need. Patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease, who perhaps believe their risk of the virus is greater than that of the general population, were significantly affected, according to a study that took a closer look at self-protection and health behavior habits among patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease during the COVID-19 pandemic. Here, the researchers observed increased levels of anxiety and self-isolation.

High Anxiety And Self-Isolation Caused By COVID-19 Pandemic in Patients With Inflammatory Rheumatic Disease

Two in Five College Football Players Underestimate Risks for Injury, Concussion

Sports have also taken the spotlight during the pandemic, as different organizations and schools grappled with how to handle upcoming seasons in light of the virus. The authors of one study noted that it’s important for athletes to be aware of all the inherent risks associated with their sport, including the chance of catching COVID-19, as well as non-COVID-19-related risks. In this survey of college football players, the researchers discovered that about 40% of these athletes underestimate their risks for concussion and injury.

Two in Five College Football Players Underestimate Risks for Injury, Concussion

Remote Monitoring Significantly Decreases Rehospitalizations in Arthroplasty Patients

Perhaps in a spot of good pandemic-related news comes the success of virtual care. The use of telemedicine surged amid the pandemic, and its usability and convenience has left patients and providers alike wondering what its future may look like post-pandemic. It may seem more difficult to implement in some specialties compared to others, including orthopedics. While orthopedic surgeries have not yet moved to the patient’s home, it appears that postoperative patient monitoring has the potential to go remote: Remote monitoring in patients who underwent joint arthroplasty led to a fourfold decrease in rehospitalizations, a randomized trial found.

Remote Monitoring Significantly Decreases Rehospitalizations in Arthroplasty Patients