Hem/Onc Roundup: First KRAS-Inhibitor Approved, Kidney Cancer Crowdfunding Frequently Misses Goal

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved sotorasib, the first targeted therapy in adults with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with KRAS G12C genetic mutations. Approval of the 960mg dose was based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling, as well as efficacy data from a subset of 124 patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS G12C-mutated NSCLC, where 36% of patients responded to treatment and 58% had a response duration of ≥6 months.

FDA Approves First Targeted Therapy for NSCLC With KRAS Mutations

Less than 10% of Crowdfunding Campaigns for Kidney Cancer Meet Goal

In other news, a study found that less than 10% of crowdfunding campaigns to cover costs of kidney cancer care frequently do not meet their fundraising goal. The investigators assessed 486 kidney cancer–related GoFundMe campaigns since 2010, and only 8.2% met or exceeded their goal. Of these “successful” campaigns, the majority were for adult patients and men, and subjects of were frequently parents and primary wage earners.

Less than 10% of Crowdfunding Campaigns for Kidney Cancer Meet Goal

Does Immunotherapy Yield Better Results for Black Prostate Cancer Patients?

A study published in Nature Communications revealed that higher levels of a specific immune cell type make immunotherapy more effective in Black patients than in White patients.  The analysis of 1300 prostate tumor samples revealed that Black patients carried higher levels of immune plasma cells than White patients and that these plasma cells were positively associated with better survival rates after surgery for all races of patients.

Does Immunotherapy Yield Better Results for Black Prostate Cancer Patients?

Barriers to Physician Skin Exam ID’d for Young Melanoma Survivors

Barriers to health care access, especially cost, are associated with increased odds of not having an annual physician skin examination among young melanoma survivors. The researchers found that 36 percent of participants had not received a skin examination in the previous year; the likelihood of receiving a skin examination was lower for Hispanic participants and those with lower socioeconomic status.

Barriers to Physician Skin Exam ID’d for Young Melanoma Survivors