Hem/Onc Roundup: Cancer’s Long-Term Impact, Lung Cancer Immunotherapy, and more

Lung Cancer Patients with a Specific Human Leukocyte Antigen More Likely to Respond to Immunotherapy

A new study shows that lung cancer patients with a particular type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) are more likely to benefit from immunotherapy. Researchers performed whole-exome sequencing on melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer tumors and blood samples. According to the results, in HLA-B44 non-small cell lung cancer patients, only those who had neoepitopes similar to those commonly found in melanoma responded to immunotherapy.

Lung Cancer Patients with a Specific Human Leukocyte Antigen More Likely to Respond to Immunotherapy

Prolonged ADT for Prostate Cancer May Increase Risk of CV Mortality

Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was found to impair cardiorespiratory fitness and increase risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality in prostate cancer patients with CV risk factors, according to a study in JACC: CardioOncology. ADT is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, set out to understand the association between ADT exposure and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), an independent predictor of CV mortality, in patients with prostate cancer.

Prolonged ADT for Prostate Cancer May Increase Risk of CV Mortality

Are Cancer Patients Willing to Participate in Clinical Trials During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Patients with and survivors of cancer are concerned about COVID-19 and, as a result, may be less willing to take part in clinical trials, according to a survey. Researchers recruited participants from the  American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network’s Survivor Views panel who were aged 18 years or older and had been diagnosed with and/or treated for cancer during the last five years. Survey questions for this study were related to COVID-19 and discussed “disposition toward trials, willingness to participate, and reasons for nonparticipation,” the researchers described.

Are Cancer Patients Willing to Participate in Clinical Trials During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Cancer Treatment Has Significant Long-lasting Effects on Patients

A recent study examined what long-lasting effects cancer treatment has on long-term survivors.

“The number of people living with and beyond cancer is increasing; a significant number of these people will experience the long-term and late effects of cancer and its treatment. Research into this group has been identified as a priority to better understand healthcare needs,” the study authors explained.

Cancer Treatment Has Significant Long-lasting Effects on Patients