Long Term Mortality Trends Among Children and Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in The United States From 2007-2017

Although congenital heart disease (CHD) mortality has reduced among all U.S. age groups, racial differences persist, according to a study presented at the ACC.20 World Congress of Cardiology. 

“Recently, there is a significant decrease in mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) in newborns and infants, but longterm mortality in older children and adults remains to be studied,” the researchers wrote in their abstract. 

To conduct this study, they used the Center for Disease Control Multiple Cause of Death registry to assess mortality trends from 2007-2017. They used ICD-10 codes to identify CHD as both a related and underlying cause of mortality and calculated the overall of percentage of change in mortality by subtracting the rate in 2007 from the rate in 2017, then dividing by the rate in 2007. 

From 2007 to 2017, there were 27,271 CHD-related deaths and 16,222 deathresulting from CHD (age-standardized mortality rates, 7.88 and 4.73 per 1,000,000 respectively) with 76.65% of deaths occurring during adulthood. During this period, researchers observed that mortality resulting from CHD declined 21% overall. Moreover, mortality resulting from CHD significantly declined among all race-ethnicities studied. However, the researchers noted, disparities persisted, overall and across all age groups The Of note, mortality resulting from CHD was consistently higher among non-Hispanic blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites. 

Umapathi KLong Term Mortality Trends Among Children and Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in The United States From 2007-2017. Presented at the ACC.20 World Congress of Cardiology; March 28-30, Chicago, IL.