Report: Long-term Statin Use Remains Safe, With Low Risk for Adverse Events

Long-term statin use remains safe and yields low risk so some clinically adverse events, according to a report by the European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel published in the July 14 issue of the European Heart Journal. The accomplished this by performing a literature search covering the time period between 2000 and 2017. 

Among the highlights of their findings, the authors noted that randomized controlled trials and genetics studies suggest statin therapy is linked with a slight increase in new-onset diabetes mellitus. Statins do not adversely affect cognitive function and also are not associated with a decrease in renal function or cataract development. Liver injury due to statin use is very rare and not clinically significant 

Among the highlights of their findings, the authors noted that randomized controlled trials and genetics studies suggest statin therapy is linked with a slight increase in new-onset diabetes mellitus. Statins do not adversely affect cognitive function and also are not associated with a decrease in renal function or cataract development. Liver injury due to statin use is very rare and not clinically significant.  

Important, they also reported that “the evidence does not support an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in individuals without cerebrovascular disease,” which had been suggested by the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction of Cholesterol Levels study in patients with prior stroke. Subsequent clinical trials did not confirm the increased stroke risk.  

“Public perception of the adverse effects of statins is often exaggerated, in part as a consequence of media reports,” they added in their conclusion. 

 

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Source: European Heart Journal