The Association of Gout with an Increased Risk of Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus Among Stroke Survivors in New Zealand: A cross-sectional Study Using Routinely Collected Electronic Health Data

BACKGROUND:

There is a paucity of data relating to the association of gout with the occurrence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in patients with stroke. This study aimed to determine the association of gout with the risk of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in a cohort of stroke patients from Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted among stroke survivors in South and East Auckland, New Zealand from the years 2010 to 2014. Electronic health record data were collected and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science version 23. Multivariate logistic regression modelling adjusted for age, gender, and ethnicity was conducted to determine the association of gout with the risk of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in patients discharged with a diagnosis of stroke.

RESULTS:

The age-, gender-, and ethnicity-adjusted odds ratio for having hypertension and diabetes mellitus among stroke survivors with gout history were 3.25 (95% confidence interval 1.32-8.03) and 1.94 (95% confidence interval 1.12-3.36), respectively. Māori stroke survivors with gout history had the highest risk of having diabetes mellitus with age- and gender-adjusted odds ratio of 5.10 (95% confidence interval 1.90-18.93).

CONCLUSION:

The findings from this study suggest gout may be independently associated with an increased risk of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in patients with stroke. Māori who are the indigenous population of New Zealand show a greater risk of diabetes mellitus associated with a gout diagnosis compared to other populations. This finding highlights the importance of the need for further research with Māori stroke survivors and other indigenous populations.