Ninety-day Postoperative Narcotic Use After Hospitalization for Orthopaedic Trauma

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to compare narcotic use in the 90-day postoperative period across orthopaedic trauma, spine, and adult reconstruction patients and examine whether patient-reported pain scores at discharge correlate with narcotic use during the 90-day postoperative period.

METHODS:

Electronic medical record query was done between 2012 and 2015 using diagnosis-related groups for spine, adult reconstruction, and trauma procedures. Demographics, length of stay (LOS), visual analog scale pain scores during hospitalization, and narcotics prescribed in the 90-day postoperative period were collected. Multivariate analysis and linear regression were done.

RESULTS:

Five thousand thirty patients were analyzed. Spine patients had the longest LOS, highest mean pain during LOS, and were prescribed the most morphine in the 90-day postoperative period. Linear regression revealed that pain scores at discharge markedly influence the quantity of narcotics prescribed in the 90-day postoperative period.

DISCUSSION:

Patient-reported pain at hospital discharge was associated with increased narcotic use in the 90-day postoperative period.

 2019 Nov 8. doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-17-00825. [Epub ahead of print]