The Influence of Asian Subgroup and Acculturation on Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge and Attitudes Among Chinese and Korean Americans

This article was originally published here

J Cancer Educ. 2021 Jun 9:1-10. doi: 10.1007/s13187-021-02042-x. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Understanding how knowledge and attitudes about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening differs among Asian immigrants is important for informing targeted health interventions aimed at preventing and treating CRC in this diverse population. This study examines how Asian subgroup and acculturation are associated with CRC knowledge and attitudes among Chinese and Korean immigrants in the United States (U.S.). Data come from the baseline survey of a randomized controlled trial to increase CRC screening among Chinese and Korean American immigrants living in the Baltimore-Washington DC Metropolitan Area (n = 400). We use linear regression to examine how Asian subgroup, time in the U.S., English-speaking proficiency, and ethnic identity are associated with CRC knowledge and screening attitudes, accounting for demographic variables, socioeconomic status, and health insurance status. Results show that greater socioeconomic status was associated with higher CRC knowledge, and socioeconomic status explained more of the variance in CRC knowledge than acculturation factors. Additionally, attitudes varied by Asian subgroup, with Chinese reporting lower CRC screening salience, worry, response efficacy, and social influence compared to Koreans. Findings suggest that in-language interventions aimed at increasing CRC knowledge and capitalizing on attitudes about screening can help to bridge disparities in CRC screening by socioeconomic status and country of origin. We discuss implications for future interventions to increase CRC screening uptake among Chinese and Korean immigrants in the U.S.

PMID:34106449 | PMC:PMC8188737 | DOI:10.1007/s13187-021-02042-x