Gastric and Small Intestine Gist: Results of 156 Cases in 20 Years

This article was originally published here

J Gastrointest Cancer. 2021 Apr 19. doi: 10.1007/s12029-021-00641-x. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Gastric and small intestine are the most common gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). There are few studies of patients who underwent surgical treatment with disparate findings. We aimed to evaluate the differences between groups and the risk factors for recurrence and mortality.

METHODS: A retrospective study of 96 gastric and 60 small intestine GIST was performed between 1995 and 2015. Both groups were compared in terms of clinicopathologic features, morbidity, recurrence, and mortality. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS®.

RESULTS: Eighty-one gastric GISTs and 56 small intestine GISTs underwent surgical treatment. Gastrointestinal bleeding was the most common cause of emergency surgery being more frequent in gastric GIST (P = 0.009); however, emergency surgery was indicated more frequently in the small intestinal GIST (P = 0.004) and was mostly due to perforation (P = 0.009). With a median follow-up of 66.9 (39.7-94.8) months, 28 (20.4%) patients had recurrence. A mitotic index > 5 (P ≤ 0.001) and the intestinal location (P = 0.012) were significantly associated to recurrence. Tumor size > 15 cm (P = 0.001) and an age of ≥ 75 years (P = 0.014) were associated to mortality. On univariate analysis, higher mean values of Ki-67 were associated to higher mortality (P = 0.0032). Small intestine GIST presented lower disease-free survival (DFS) than that of gastric GIST (65.7% vs 90.8%) with P = 0.003. The overall survival (OS) of gastric and small intestine GIST was 74.7% and 71.6%, respectively (P = 0.68).

CONCLUSION: Small intestine GIST received emergency surgery more frequently showing lower DFS and same OS than that of gastric GIST. We found that Ki-67 could be a prognostic factor. Further studies are necessary to assess whether Ki-67 is a prognostic risk factor for GISTs.

PMID:33871798 | DOI:10.1007/s12029-021-00641-x