Is there any association between green tea consumption and the risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Finding from a case-control study

Green tea consumption has been shown to reduce the incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in experimental animal models, however the results from human studies are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between green tea consumption and the risk of HNSCC. 

The study utilised a standardised questionnaire to investigate the relationship between green tea consumption and HNSCC experience. Data about amount of green tea consumption was recorded from 147 patients with HNSCC and 263 age and gender matched controls. The results were analyzed with SPSS statistical software Version 21 using Chi- square test, and Logistic Regression (with a 95% confidence interval). Significance levels were set at 95% and p-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. 

Statistical analysis indicated significant differences between different groups of tea consumers in terms of HNSCC risk (P < 0.001). The risk of developing oral cancer those who consume <1 cup of green tea daily was (OR = 0.29 (0.16-0.52) and for the group of > = 1 cup green tea consumers was 0.38(0.17-0.86) of those who never consume green tea (Reference point) after adjustment for other risk factors. 

The findings support that green tea consumption may reduce the risk of HNSCC. To confirm the efficacy of green tea intake in preventing the development of HNSCC in humans further investigation is needed. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30583134