Clinical practice guidelines and principles of care for people with dementia: a protocol for undertaking a Delphi technique to identify the recommendations relevant to primary care nurses in the delivery of person-centred dementia care

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BMJ Open. 2021 May 13;11(5):e044843. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-044843.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Nationally and internationally it is well recognised that dementia is poorly recognised and suboptimally managed in the primary care setting. There are multiple and complex reasons for this gap in care, including a lack of knowledge, high care demands and inadequate time for the general practitioner alone to manage dementia with its multiple physical, psychological and social dimensions. The primary care nurse potentially has a role in assisting the general practitioner in the provision of evidence-based dementia care. Although dementia-care guidelines for general practitioners exist, evidence on resources to support the primary care nurse in dementia care provision is scarce. The ‘Australian Clinical Practice Guidelines and Principles of Care for People with Dementia’ provides 109 recommendations for the diagnosis and management of dementia. This protocol describes a Delphi study to identify which of the 109 recommendations contained in these multidisciplinary guidelines are relevant to the primary care nurse in the delivery of person-centred dementia care in the general practice setting.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Using a Delphi consensus online survey, an expert panel will grade each of the recommendations written in the ‘Clinical Practice Guidelines and Principles of Care for People with Dementia’ as high-to-low relevance with respect to the role of the primary care nurse in general practice. To optimise reliability of results, quality indicators will be used in the data collection and reporting of the study. Invited panel members will include Australian primary care nurses working in general practice, primary care nursing researchers and representatives of the Australian Primary Health Care Nurses Association, the peak professional body for nurses working in primary healthcare.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by The University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) (H-2019-0029).Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at scientific conferences.

PMID:33986053 | DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2020-044843